1 | Guest lecture Working with Models of Ageing – Entanglements of Human and Animal Health and Wellbeing 2 | Climate change and health conference - Federal Council for Sustainable Development  3 | ASCID Evening Symposium on Tick-borne Diseases 4 | Day of Environmental Health at the School for Public Health 5 | 30 year anniversary celebration of the Institute for Environment and Sustainable development 6 | Registration open for Healthy Urban Living - H2020 Health Matchmaking & Infoday 7 | Info Day on Health, Demographic Change and Wellbeing 8 | The International Society for Economics and Social Sciences of Animal Health Conference 9 | Call for Papers: Medicines for the Anthropocene: Health on a Finite Planet 10 | Agrobiodiversity Investments as Triple Win for Health, Environment and Food System Sustainability 11 | Botanic Gardens: Using Biodiversity to Improve Human Well-being  12 | "3 questions to" Thierry van den Berg, Operational director Animal infectious diseases at CODA-CERVA

Newsletter - October 2017 Second Edition


CONTENTS

Events in Belgium
International
International Publications  
Events in Belgium
1 | Guest lecture Working with Models of Ageing – Entanglements of Human and Animal Health and Wellbeing

On October 24, Joanna Latimer (Professor of Sociology, Science & Technology & Director of the Science & Technology Studies Unit (SATSU), University of York, UK) will give a lecture on ‘Working with Models of Ageing: Entanglements of Human and Animal Health and Wellbeing’.

You can find more information here.

When ? 24 October 2017, 2PM - 4PM
Where ? KU Leuven

 
2 | Climate change and health conference - Federal Council for Sustainable Development 
Climate change results in risks such as heat waves, extreme drought, forest fires and air pollution, but also extreme rain and changing seasons. In this conference the impact for hulan health will be discussed, both in Europe and Belgium.

More information here.

When ? Thursday 26 of October 2017, 2PM 
Where ? Belgian Senate, Brussels
 
3 | ASCID Evening Symposium on Tick-borne Diseases
The Antwerp Study Centre for Infectious Diseases (ASCID) presents its fourth evening symposium on 14 November 2017. ASCID is a unique collaboration between VAXINFECTIO (Vaccine- and Infectious Disease Institute) and EVECO (Evolutionary Ecology Group), And formally recognized as a ‘Centre of Excellence’ by the University of Antwerp. Presentations will be given by leading experts in the field of Tick-Borne Diseases.

More information on the programme can be found on here.

When ? 14 of November 2017
Where ? University of Antwerp
 
4 | Day of Environmental Health at the School for Public Health
The Environmental Health Research Centre and Occupational Health of ULB organizes its 5th day of environmental health on the 24th of November 2017.

More information will follow later.

When ? 24 of November 2017
Where ? ULB
 
5 | 30 year anniversary celebration of the Institute for Environment and Sustainable development

Key note speaker will be Prof. dr. Hans Bruyninckx, Director of the European Environment Agency.

You can find more information here.

When ? 28 November 2017
Where ? University of Antwerp
 
International
6 | Registration open for Healthy Urban Living - H2020 Health Matchmaking & Infoday

Interested in setting up an international project with partners from the Netherlands and other countries? University Medical Center Utrecht and regional parties together with the Dutch National Contact Point for Horizon 2020 and the Enterprise Europe Network will organise 2 days dedicated to project building for research and technology innovation and funding information. 

The activities are clustered around three themes: Future Health Technologies, Future Healthy Society healthy living in an inclusive society), Future Urban Sustainability (sustainable urban environments). 

For more detailed information on the event and registration please visit the event website

When ? 9 - 10 November 2017
Where ? Utrecht, The Netherlands
 
7 | Info Day on Health, Demographic Change and Wellbeing

You can now register for the Info Day on Health, Demographic Change and Wellbeing which will take place on the 8th of December in Brussels. Participation is free. Seats will be allocated on a 'first come, first served' basis

More information here.

When ? 8 December 2017
Where ? Charlemagne building, Brussels, Belgium

 
8 | The International Society for Economics and Social Sciences of Animal Health Conference

The ISESSAH 2018 conference will provide a forum to meet colleagues and leading thinkers in the field to enhance the use of economics in animal health education, research and policy making internationally. The combination of ISESSAH 2018 and INNOVSUR event co-organised by the French Institute for Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD) will provide a specific opportunity for greater North-South interactions and emphasize on environmental and agricultural health economic issues.

More information here.

When ? 14-18 May 2018
Where ? Montpellier, France
 

International Publications
9 | Call for Papers: Medicines for the Anthropocene: Health on a Finite Planet

Edited by Stephen Quilley and Katharine Zywert, School of Environment, Resources and Sustainability, University of Waterloo, Canada. To propose a chapter, please complete the application form here.

Applications are due on Friday, December 1st, 2017.
 
10 | Agrobiodiversity Investments as Triple Win for Health, Environment and Food System Sustainability

A comprehensive scientific analysis of how agrobiodiversity can make our vulnerable food system more resilient, sustainable and nutritious has been carried out by leading agrobiodiversity research centre Bioversity International. The 200-page guide provides solid evidence that investments in agrobiodiversity also play a critical yet overlooked role in tackling wider global targets such as reducing poverty and malnutrition, reversing environmental degradation and combatting climate change. It demonstrates that agrobiodiversity can be a more mainstream approach to sustainable development.

 
11 | Botanic Gardens: Using Biodiversity to Improve Human Well-being 

This report highlights how botanic gardens across the world are involved in a variety of projects that use biodiversity to improve human well-being and is based upon an extensive literature survey, and a multilingual survey of BGCI’s members.

12 | "3 questions to" Thierry van den Berg, Operational director Animal infectious diseases at CODA-CERVA

 
1. How is the relation between nature & human health part of your work/activities? 
I am a veterinarian and I am working since more than 30 years on animal diseases. Our institute is the national reference laboratory for about 40 animal diseases among which some have a zoonotic potential. I spent a large part of my career on avian influenza and, especially, on the famous H5N1, a virus of “our own hatching”. The influenza virus has existed for thousands of years as harmless virus in the gut of wild waterfowls but recently turned out to become a poultry killer and a top one candidate for pandemic. It is indeed reported that 61% of known pathogens can infect multiple animal species and 75% of all diseases which have emerged in the last two decades are of wildlife origin. Newly emerging and re-emerging infections are now recognised as a global problem, and 75% of these are potentially zoonotic. It is now clear that emerging infectious diseases events are not simply about pathogens jumping species barriers. They are made of complex relations that involve socioeconomic and socio-political drivers and their consequences extend beyond the impact of the disease itself. One of the most significant changes in our society has been the "livestock revolution", whereby the stock of food animals, their productivity and their trade has increased rapidly to feed the fast expanding of increasingly rich and urbanized human population. This has led professionals involved in both animal and public health to recognize “veterinary public health” (VPH) as a key area for their activities to address the human-animal interface.
 
2. How important is collaboration between different groups in the work on nature - health linkages?
 
Most veterinarians contribute, directly or indirectly, to public health goals and outcomes. The One Health approach acknowledges that population health is dependent on the biological interactions between animal and human diseases in a social and ecological environment. Humans and animals interact with high frequency and overcrowding in a globalized world. Emerging zoonoses are only one of a number of consequences of intensive livestock production systems, together with antimicrobial consumption and resistance, disruption of nutrient cycles and greenhouse gases emissions, with direct or indirect impacts on human health. A multidisciplinary approach is thus required to address these questions. In this context, the upcoming “Sciensano” institute will soon regroup the Scientific Institute of Public Health (WIV-ISP) and the Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre (CODA-CERVA). Both institutes will join forces to better understand human and animal health through scientific research aiming at enhancing the well-being of all.

3. Where would you like the work on nature - health linkages to be in a few years?

EcoHealth examines changes in the biological, physical, social and economic environments and relates these changes to human health. One Health represents a call for health researchers and practitioners at the human, animal and environmental interfaces to work together to mitigate the risks of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. There are, however, socio-political, economical, ethical and legal challenges, which must be met by such approach. The implementation of One Health/Ecohealth concepts must therefore benefit from transdisciplinary processes between policy, science and practice. Such networks should not be limited to scientific experts, but also be open to policy experts, local knowledge, practitioners, citizens and all relevant stakeholders. This is very challenging as the traditional "silo" thinking must be replaced with broader perspectives on the continuum of health but one must be careful not creating big One Health/Ecohealth institutions resulting in building fences rather than creating openness to collaborations. This may be overcome by focusing on open, collaborative networks like Communities of Practice, which are less institutionally bound and more flexible, and can be open to newcomers and new ideas and approaches. In addition, inter-and transdisciplinary education must facilitate this collaborative work and more and more veterinary schools have now specific VPH educational programs. Hopefully, Belgian funding agencies will keep investing in this holistic approach.